Image ID
DN-0063966
Headline
Eugene Brieux, French author and dramatist, sitting in study
Date Created
January 19, 1915
Creator
Chicago Daily News, Inc.
Creator Role
photographer
Artwork/Object Depicted
glass negatives
Copyright Notice
© Sun-Times Media, LLC. All rights reserved.
Credit Line
DN-0063966, Chicago Sun-Times/Chicago Daily News Collection, Chicago History Museum
Inventory Number
1960.784
Storage Location
Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago History Museum
Horizon Bib. No.
103178
Max Pixels - Height
498
Max Pixels - Width
391
KEYWORDS
Reid, Murdoch & Company Building.
320 North Clark Street (Chicago, Ill.)


Motorboats--American--Illinois--Chicago--1910-1919.--lctgm
Crowds--Illinois--Chicago--1910-1919.--lctgm
Chicago River (Ill.)--1910-1919.
Loop (Chicago, Ill.)--1910-1919.
Chicago (Ill.)--1910-1919.
Dry plate negatives.--gmgpc
Gelatin dry plate negatives.--aat


United StatesIllinoisCook CountyChicago.
eugene brieux french author and dramatist sitting in study

Three-quarter length portrait of Eugene Brieux, French author and dramatist, sitting in the study of Mrs. Harry Channon during a visit to Chicago. Mrs. Channon resided at 1434 North Astor Street in the Near North Side community area of Chicago, Illinois. Brieux's play Les Avaries (Damaged Goods) addressed the issue of venereal disease. During his visit to Chicago, he spoke in favor of eugenics and the transmission of good health to future generations in response to the depletion of the European population as a result of World War I.

Three-quarter length portrait of Eugene Brieux, French author and dramatist, sitting in the study of Mrs. Harry Channon during a visit to Chicago. Mrs. Channon resided at 1434 North Astor Street in the Near North Side community area of Chicago, Illinois. Brieux's play Les Avaries (Damaged Goods) addressed the issue of venereal disease. During his visit to Chicago, he spoke in favor of eugenics and the transmission of good health to future generations in response to the depletion of the European population as a result of World War I.