Image ID
DN-0065418
Headline
Mrs. Tony Panichi sitting outdoors on a concrete bench
Date Created
circa October 27, 1915
Creator
Chicago Daily News, Inc.
Creator Role
photographer
Artwork/Object Depicted
glass negatives
Copyright Notice
© Sun-Times Media, LLC. All rights reserved.
Credit Line
DN-0065418, Chicago Sun-Times/Chicago Daily News Collection, Chicago History Museum
Inventory Number
1960.784
Storage Location
Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago History Museum
Horizon Bib. No.
104416
Max Pixels - Height
394
Max Pixels - Width
498
KEYWORDS
Illinois.--National Guard.
Illinois.--National Guard.--Regiment, 1st.--Battery C.


Soldiers--Illinois--Chicago--1910-1919.--lctgm
Railroads--Illinois--Chicago--1910-1919.--lctgm
Flags--American--1910-1919.--lctgm
47th Street (Chicago, Ill.)--1910-1919.
Wabash Avenue (Chicago, Ill.)--1910-1919.
Grand Boulevard (Chicago, Ill.)--1910-1919.
Chicago (Ill.)--1910-1919.
Dry plate negatives.--gmgpc
Gelatin dry plate negatives.--aat


United StatesIllinoisCook CountyChicago.
mrs tony panichi sitting outdoors on a concrete bench

Portrait of Mrs. Tony Panichi sitting outdoors on a concrete bench in Chicago, Illinois. Buildings are visible in the distance behind her. Her husband was an employee of the Scotch Wollen mills who was accused of shooting and killing Samuel Kapper, a striking garment worker, during a melee. His wife was accused of handing him the gun that he used to shoot at strikers. A judge dropped the charges on November 19th on the grounds that Panichi believed his life was in danger from the "slugging" that frequently occurred during the bitter strike of garment workers.

Portrait of Mrs. Tony Panichi sitting outdoors on a concrete bench in Chicago, Illinois. Buildings are visible in the distance behind her. Her husband was an employee of the Scotch Wollen mills who was accused of shooting and killing Samuel Kapper, a striking garment worker, during a melee. His wife was accused of handing him the gun that he used to shoot at strikers. A judge dropped the charges on November 19th on the grounds that Panichi believed his life was in danger from the "slugging" that frequently occurred during the bitter strike of garment workers.