Image ID
DN-0067214
Headline
Presidential candidate, Charles Hughes, and his wife, standing on a train platform, at Union Passenger Station, shaking hands with supporters
Date Created
October 18, 1916
Creator
Chicago Daily News, Inc.
Creator Role
photographer
Artwork/Object Depicted
glass negatives
Copyright Notice
© Sun-Times Media, LLC. All rights reserved.
Credit Line
DN-0067214, Chicago Sun-Times/Chicago Daily News Collection, Chicago History Museum
Inventory Number
1960.784
Storage Location
Chicago Daily News negatives collection, Chicago History Museum
Horizon Bib. No.
105460
Max Pixels - Height
391
Max Pixels - Width
494
KEYWORDS
Douglas, Stephen A.--(Stephen Arnold),--1813-1861--Statues--Illinois--Chicago.



Modeling (Sculpture)--1910-1919.--lctgm
Statues--Illinois--Chicago--1910-1919.--lctgm
Chicago (Ill.)--1910-1919.
Dry plate negatives.--gmgpc
Gelatin dry plate negatives.--aat


United StatesIllinoisCook CountyChicago.
presidential candidate charles hughes and his wife standing on a train platform at union passenger station shaking hands with supporters

Image of Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican presidential candidate, and his wife standing on a train platform and shaking hands with supporters. Mrs. Hughes is leaning forward. The train was at Union Passenger Station in the Near West Side community area of Chicago, Illinois, where a crowd of 200 people gathered to meet him. A tattered American flag is attached to the platform's railing. Hughes was governor of New York from 1907-10, and Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1910-16.

Image of Charles Evans Hughes, the Republican presidential candidate, and his wife standing on a train platform and shaking hands with supporters. Mrs. Hughes is leaning forward. The train was at Union Passenger Station in the Near West Side community area of Chicago, Illinois, where a crowd of 200 people gathered to meet him. A tattered American flag is attached to the platform's railing. Hughes was governor of New York from 1907-10, and Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court from 1910-16.